Donald Trump Now Campaigns - USA News Headline

When President Donald Trump drew widespread condemnation for describing a majority-black congressional district as a “rat and rodent infested mess” and for tweets targeting four Democratic congresswomen of color, it was not the first time a U.S. president attracted such attention. Throughout American history, presidents have uttered comments, issued decisions and made public and private moves that critics said were racist, either at the time or in later generations. The presidents did so both before taking office and during their time in the White House. Many of the early presidents, George Washington to Zachary Taylor, owned black slaves and held power when African Americans, Native Americans and Latinos did not have the right to vote or serve on juries and could be refused service in public accommodations. They often repeated commonly held racist views, even when challenged by scholars or civil rights leaders. Before he became the nation’s third president, Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal.” But in his only book, “Notes on the State of Virginia,” published in 1785, the future president expressed a series of beliefs about African Americans that would be seen today as racist. He wrote that blacks were cursed with “a very strong and disagreeable odor” and were incapable of producing art and poetry. And though he said he believed slavery was immoral, he owned slaves and, historians say, carried on a sexual relationship with at least one of them, Sally Hemings. If every black slave wereContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Donald Trump, Elijah Cummings - USA News

Facing growing accusations of racism for his incendiary tweets, President Donald Trump is seeking to deflect the criticism by labeling a leading black congressman as himself racist. In the latest rhetorical shot at lawmakers of color, Trump said his weekend comments referring to Rep. Elijah Cummings’ majority-black Baltimore district as a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” where “no human being would want to live” were not racist. Instead, Trump argued, “if racist Elijah Cummings would focus more of his energy on helping the good people of his district, and Baltimore itself, perhaps progress could be made in fixing the mess.” “His radical ‘oversight’ is a joke!” Trump tweeted Sunday. After a weekend of attacks on Cummings, the son of former sharecroppers who rose to become the powerful chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, Trump expanded his attacks Monday to include a prominent Cummings defender, the Rev. Al Sharpton, who was traveling to Baltimore to hold a press conference in condemnation of the president. “Al is a con man, a troublemaker, always looking for a score,” Trump tweeted ahead of the press conference, adding that the civil rights activist and MSNBC host “Hates Whites & Cops!” Trump appeared to dig a deeper hole even as a top White House aide sought to dismiss the controversy by describing Trump’s comments as hyperbole. Two weeks ago, Trump caused a nationwide uproar with racist tweets directed at four Democratic congresswomen of color as he looked to stoke racial divisions for politicalContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Donald Trump and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez - USA Today Politics News

In a remarkable political repudiation, the Democratic-led U.S. House voted to condemn President Donald Trump’s “racist comments” against four congresswomen of color, despite protestations by Trump’s Republican congressional allies and his own insistence he hasn’t “a racist bone in my body.” Two days after Trump tweeted that four Democratic freshmen should “go back” to their home countries — though all are citizens and three were born in the U.S.A. — Democrats muscled the resolution through the chamber by 240-187 over near-solid GOP opposition. The rebuke Tuesday night was an embarrassing one for Trump even though it carries no legal repercussions, but if anything his latest harangues should help him with his die-hard conservative base. Despite a lobbying effort by Trump and party leaders for a unified GOP front, four Republicans voted to condemn his remarks: moderate Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Fred Upton of Michigan, Will Hurd of Texas and Susan Brooks of Indiana, who is retiring. Also backing the measure was Michigan’s independent Rep. Justin Amash, who left the GOP this month after becoming the party’s sole member of Congress to back a Trump impeachment inquiry. Democrats saved one of the day’s most passionate moments until near the end. “I know racism when I see it,” said Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, whose skull was fractured at the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” civil rights march in Selma, Alabama. “At the highest level of government, there’s no room for racism.” Before the showdown roll call, Trump characteristically plunged forward with time-testedContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Rashida Harbi Tlaib, Rashida Tlaib - US Politics

Palestinians denounced President Donald Trump’s attack on U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, accusing him of racism and saying it once again proves his bias against the Palestinian people. Tlaib, a Michigan Democrat and daughter of Palestinian immigrants, was one of four congresswomen of color who were targeted in a Trump Twitter barrage over the weekend. Trump said the women should go back to the “broken and crime infested” places they came from, ignoring the fact that all are American citizens and three, including Tlaib, were born in the U.S. Trump also accused them of saying “terrible things” about the U.S. and said they “hate Israel.” Although Rashida Tlaib has never lived in the West Bank, she still has relatives in the area and is widely seen as a local hero for making her way to the highest levels of American government. Bassam Tlaib, an uncle of the congresswoman who lives in the West Bank, called the president’s comments “a racist statement meant to target Rashida because she has Palestinian roots.” “This statement proves that Trump is anti-Palestinian, anti-Islam and completely biased toward Israel,” he added. He said “the main source of crime” in the West Bank is Israel’s half-century-long occupation. The Palestinians seek the West Bank as the heartland of a future state, with east Jerusalem as their capital. “Instead of helping our people get back their rights, President Trump has chosen to stand beside the oppressors, not the oppressed,” he said. Ibrahim Milhim, spokesman for the Palestinian Authority, said Trump’sContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley - USA News

Defiant in the face of widespread criticism, President Donald Trump renewed his belligerent call for four Democratic congresswomen of color to get out of the U.S. “right now,” cementing his position as the most willing U.S. leader in generations to stoke the discord that helped send him to the White House. Content to gamble that a sizable chunk of the electorate embraces his tweets that have been widely denounced as racist, the president made clear that he has no qualms about exploiting racial divisions once again. “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me,” Donald Trump said Monday at the White House. “A lot of people love it, by the way.” The episode served notice that Trump is willing to again rely on incendiary rhetoric on issues of race and immigration to preserve his political base in the leadup to the 2020 election. There was near unanimous condemnation from Democrats for Trump’s comments and a rumble of discontent from a subset of Republicans — but notably not from the party’s congressional leaders. Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah, the party’s White House nominee in 2012 and now one of the president’s most vocal GOP critics, said Trump’s comments were “destructive, demeaning, and disunifying.” Far from backing down, Trump on Monday dug in on comments he had initially made a day earlier on Twitter that if lawmakers “hate our country,” they can go back to their “broken and crime-infested” countries. His remarks were directed at four congresswomen: Reps. IlhanContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up