Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell - USA News

It’s not quite “Trump-McConnell 2020,” but it might as well be. As he runs for reelection, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is positioning himself as the president’s wingman, his trusted right hand in Congress, transformed from a behind-the-scenes player into a prominent if sometimes reviled Republican like none other besides Donald Trump himself.Trends For You 🔥 Trump and His Controversial Peace Plan For Palestine and Israel Donald Trump Exacting Swift Punishment Against Those Who Crossed Him Sanders Finds Unusual Ally in Trump “In Washington, President Trump and I are making America great again!” Mitch McConnell declared at a rally in Kentucky, his voice rising over protesters. Other than Democrat Nancy Pelosi — and more recently Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — no current politician has so quickly become such a high-profile object of partisan scorn. McConnell was heckled last weekend at his home state’s annual “Fancy Farm” political picnic, and protesters outside his Louisville house hurled so many profanities that Twitter temporarily shut down his account for posting video of them online. Undaunted, he revels in the nickname he’s given himself — the “Grim Reaper,” bragging that he’s burying the House Democrats’ agenda — though he seems stung by one lobbed by opponents, “Moscow Mitch.” But the Democrats’ agenda includes gun legislation to require background checks that Trump now wants to consider, forcing McConnell to adjust his earlier refusal to do so. The Senate leader has been here before, pushing ahead with a Trump priority that’s unpopular with most Republicans. But this willContinue reading

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Mitch McConnell - US Politics

Shifting the gun violence debate, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Thursday he now wants to consider background checks and other bills, setting up a potentially pivotal moment when lawmakers return in the fall.Trends For You 🔥 Donald Trump Exacting Swift Punishment Against Those Who Crossed Him Trump and His Controversial Peace Plan For Palestine and Israel Maduro: Guaidó ‘Will Be Jailed’ For ‘All Crimes He’s Committed’ The Republican leader won’t be calling senators back to work early, as some are demanding. But he told a Kentucky radio station that President Donald Trump called him Thursday morning and they talked about several ideas. The president, he said, is “anxious to get an outcome and so am I.” Stakes are high for all sides, but particularly for Trump and his party. Republicans have long opposed expanding background checks — a bill passed by the Democratic-led House is stalled in the Senate — but they face enormous pressure to do something after mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people. McConnell, who is facing protests outside his Louisville home, can shift attention back to Democrats by showing a willingness to engage ahead of the 2020 election. “What we can’t do is fail to pass something,” McConnell said. “What I want to see here is an outcome.” McConnell said he and Trump discussed various ideas on the call, including background checks and the so-called “red flag” laws that allow authorities to seize firearms from someone deemed a threatContinue reading

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Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell - US Politics

More than 200 mayors, including two anguished by mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, are urging the Senate to return to the Capitol to act on gun safety legislation amid criticism that Congress is failing to respond to back-to-back shootings that left 31 people dead.Trends For You 🔥 Donald Trump Exacting Swift Punishment Against Those Who Crossed Him Trump and His Controversial Peace Plan For Palestine and Israel Maduro: Guaidó ‘Will Be Jailed’ For ‘All Crimes He’s Committed’ In a letter Thursday to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and the Democratic leader, Chuck Schumer, the mayors wrote, “Our nation can no longer wait for our federal government to take the actions necessary to prevent people who should not have access to firearms from being able to purchase them.” The mayors urged the Senate to vote on two House-passed bills expanding background checks for gun sales that passed that chamber earlier this year. It was signed by El Paso, Texas, Mayor Dee Margo, Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley and others where mass shootings have occurred, including Orlando and Parkland, Florida, Pittsburgh and Annapolis, Maryland. “Quick passage of these bills is a critical step to reducing gun violence in our country,” they wrote. The push comes as McConnell, the Republican leader, resists pressure to recall senators from the congressional recess, despite wrenching calls to “do something” in the aftermath of the shootings. Instead, the Republican leader is taking a more measured approach, as GOP senators talk frequently among themselves and with theContinue reading

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Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell - US Politics

SENATE MAJORITY LEADER Mitch McConnell on Tuesday urged his Democratic colleagues to move on after the conclusion of special counsel Robert Mueller's two-year Russia investigation, declaring "case closed."

In a speech from the Senate floor, the Kentucky Republican said Mueller became a "secular saint" for Democrats "destined to rescue the country from the inconvenient truth" that President Donald Trump was elected. McConnell mocked Democrats for "working through the five stages of grief" since last month's release of the 448-page redacted report.

"There's this outrage industrial complex that spans from Capitol press conferences to cable news," McConnell said Tuesday. "They're grieving that the national crisis they spent two years wishing for didn't materialize. But for the rest of the country, this is good news."

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