Mexico

U.S. Asylum-Seekers

A Trump administration program forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico has evolved into a sweeping rejection of all forms of migrants, with both countries quietly working to keep people out of the U.S. despite threats to the migrants’ safety. The results serve the goals of both governments, which have targeted unauthorized migration at the behest of President Donald Trump, who threatened Mexico with potentially crippling tariffs earlier this year to force action. Some people sent to wait in the Mexican border cities of Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros said they never requested asylum, including Wilfredo Alvarez, a laborer from Honduras. He crossed the Rio Grande without permission to look for work to support his seven children and was unexpectedly put into the program. He was sent back to Mexico with a future court date. “We thought that if they caught us, they would deport us to our country, but it was not that way,” Alvarez said. “They threw us away here to Mexico, but we are not from here and it’s very difficult.” Others said they were never asked if they feared persecution in Mexico, despite U.S. government rules that say migrants should not be sent there if they face that risk. U.S. border agents give each returned migrant a date for an immigration court hearing at tents set up near the border. But the Mexican government has bused hundreds of migrants to cities around 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) away, ostensibly for their safety. And there’s no promise that MexicoContinue reading

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Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador - Lopez Obrador - Mexico Politics

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Monday he would like to disband the army and put national security in the hands of the new National Guard militarised police force, though he recognised the proposal was unlikely to happen. In an interview with Mexican newspaper La Jornada, the leftist president said he favoured guaranteeing the nation’s security through the National Guard, which he formally inaugurated on Sunday. “If were up to me, I would get rid of the army and turn it into the National Guard, declare that Mexico is a pacifist country that does not need a military and that the defence of the nation, if necessary, would be done by all,” Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said. Only a few countries in the world have abolished standing armies, among them the Latin American nations of Costa Rica and Panama. Mexico’s army has traditionally kept on the sidelines of international conflict, but has been deployed to tackle drug gangs since 2007. Lopez Obrador recognised the political challenges to eliminating the military, adding: “I can’t do it because there is resistance. One thing is what is desirable and another thing is what is possible.” The creation of the National Guard, which launched with 70,000 members and which Lopez Obrador intends to grow to 150,000 units across Mexico, has raised concerns about the militarization of law enforcement in Mexico. Lopez Obrador has already tapped the force, which was created by a constitutional change, to patrol the country’s northern and southern bordersContinue reading

Donald Trump, Andrés Manuel López Obrador - USA, Mexico

Three days after U.S. President Donald Trump announced a deal with Mexico to stem the flow of migrants at the southern border, the two countries appear unable to agree on exactly what’s in it. Stung by criticism that the agreement mostly ramps up border protection efforts already underway, Trump on Monday hinted at other, secret agreements he says will soon be revealed. “We have fully signed and documented another very important part of the Immigration and Security deal with Mexico, one that the U.S. has been asking about getting for many years,” Trump wrote Monday, saying it would “be revealed in the not too distant future.” Not so, said Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard, holding up a paper and pointing to the previously announced details. He told reporters the two countries agreed on two actions made public Friday and said if those measures didn’t work to slow migration, they would discuss further options. “There is no other thing beyond what I have just explained,” he said. The episode revealed the complicated political dynamics at play as Trump and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador tussle over who made out best in the agreement hashed out under Trump’s threat of new tariffs on Mexico. Trump appeared eager to declare his negotiation tactics successful, even as he tried to hype the deal with made-for-TV drama and invented measures, sparking questions and confusion. Mexico’s leaders showed they weren’t willing to play along. The White House did not respond to inquiries about Trump’s tweets.Continue reading

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Donald Trump - USA Headlines Story Now

President Donald Trump announced late Friday that he had suspended plans to impose tariffs on Mexico, tweeting that the country “has agreed to take strong measures” to stem the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. But the deal the two neighbors agreed to falls short of some of the dramatic overhauls the U.S. had pushed for. A “U.S.-Mexico Joint Declaration” released by the State Department said the U.S. “will immediately expand the implementation” of a program that returns asylum-seekers who cross the southern border to Mexico while their claims are adjudicated. Mexico will “offer jobs, healthcare and education” to those people, the agreement stated. Mexico has also agreed, it said, to take “unprecedented steps to increase enforcement to curb irregular migration,” including the deployment of the Mexican National Guard throughout the country, especially on its southern border with Guatemala. And Mexico is taking “decisive action to dismantle human smuggling and trafficking organizations as well as their illicit financial and transportation networks,” the State Department said. The move puts to an end — for now — a threat that had sparked dire warnings from members of Trump’s own party, who warned the tariffs would damage the economy, drive up prices for consumers and imperil an updated North American trade pact. Trump’s Friday night tweet marked a sharp reversal from earlier in the day, when his spokeswoman Sarah Sanders told reporters: “Our position has not changed. The tariffs are going forward as of Monday.” Mexican President Andrés Manuel LópezContinue reading

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US Army Quickly Uncoiling Vicious Fencing Along Border With Mexico - US News

Virginia, an 18-year-old from Guatemala who is seeking asylum in the United States, had just one form of identification on her long journey north: her birth certificate. Now, the teenager waits in a shelter in a Mexican border town while her U.S. asylum case is decided – minus the birth certificate. Virginia said that when she turned herself in to immigration authorities in El Paso, U.S. officials took the certificate and refused to return it. “The more I asked the angrier they got,” she said. Discouraged by the asylum process, Virginia said she is considering abandoning her claim and going home but feels trapped without identification to show authorities along the way. She spoke on the condition that only her first name be published for fear of drawing attention to her situation. Ciudad Juarez officials and migrant attorneys say many asylum seekers are in a position similar to Virginia’s, left with no identification because U.S. officials confiscated their documents before sending them back to Mexico. Without ?IDs?, they say, it can be hard for migrants to find work in Mexico, receive money from their families or even return home. An official with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, who declined to be named, said it has been federal policy since 2015 to return possessions to migrants upon their release from custody – except for documents believed to be fraudulent or altered. The official did not address whether the policy was being followed consistently and declined to comment on specific casesContinue reading

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Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador - Lopez Obrador - Mexico News Politics Today

Mexico’s president said on Friday (May 31) he would respond with “great prudence” to threats by his US counterpart Donald Trump to impose tariffs on Mexican goods entering the United States, and called on Mexicans to unite to face the challenge. Mr Trump says he will introduce punitive tariffs on June 10 if Mexico does not halt the flow of illegal immigration from Central America to the United States, battering Mexican financial assets and hurting stocks worldwide. It is the biggest foreign policy test to date for President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who during his six months in power has consistently sought to deflect Mr Trump’s barbs and avoid embroiling himself in confrontations. Mr Lopez Obrador predicted the Trump administration would rectify the tariff threat and said that Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard would be in Washington working to convince the US government that Mr Trump’s measures were in neither country’s interest, and that Mexico was making progress containing migration. Mr Trump said on Thursday he would ratchet up tariffs unless Mexico stopped people from illegally crossing the border it shares with the United States. The plan would impose a 5 per cent tariff on Mexican imports starting on June 10 and increase monthly, up to 25 per cent on Oct 1. Speaking at his regular morning news conference, Mr Lopez Obrador said he believed Mr Trump would understand that the tariff threat was not the way to resolve the matter, and stressed that Mexicans had united behind his government. “IContinue reading

Emiliano Zapata - Mexico News Today

Born on August 8, 1879, Emiliano Zapata was orphaned at the age of 17. A revolutionary from an early age, in 1897 he was arrested because he took part in a protest by the peasants of his village against the hacienda (plantation) that had appropriated their lands. After he was pardoned, he continued to agitate among the peasants, and because of his rabble-rousing, he was subsequently drafted into the Mexican army.

After serving for only six months, Zapata was discharged to a landowner to train his horses in Mexico City. In 1909 his leadership skills were already well known, and he was summoned to his village of birth, Anenecuilco, where he was elected as the village’s council board president.Continue reading

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador - Lopez Obrador - Mexico Politics Today HEadline

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was born on 13 November 1953 to a family of modest means in the southeastern state of Tabasco. Lopez Obrador worked for the state’s indigenous affairs bureau in the 1970s. As a boy in the state of Tabasco, he played center field on the local baseball team and sold imported U.S. clothes at his father’s store. It was the 1960s, and some of his friends thought López Obrador might join Mexico’s burgeoning business community.

In his early 20s, López Obrador took a job working with an indigenous group called the Chontal Maya, some of Mexico’s poorest people, who happened to be sitting atop billions of dollars in untapped petroleum. The unfairness enraged him. He lived in a dirt-floor shack and slept on a hammock with his young wife. He cultivated a group of activists, poets and disaffected oilmen, meeting late in the night.Continue reading

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador - Lopez Obrador - Mexico Politics

“It might seem pretentious or exaggerated to say it, but today is not just the start of a new government. It is the start of a political regime change. We will carry out a peaceful and orderly but also deep and radical transformation,” Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said.Continue reading

Jim Mattis - USA News Today

President Donald Trump ordered the unusual deployment of active-duty troops to the border in response to a caravan of Central American migrants walking north toward the U.S. Critics dismissed the deployment as a political stunt ahead of the midterm elections.Continue reading

, US-Mexico BorderHonduran Migrants News

"We want them to return to Honduras," Rivera said, adding that each migrant must weigh whether to go home, appeal for asylum in Mexico or wait in line to apply for asylum in the U.S.

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