EU

Simon Coveney - Ireland News

Irish FM Simon Coveney: “Ireland is in no doubt as to what a no deal means for us. It is very damaging, very difficult and it poses huge questions for politics and potentially for the management of civic unrest in the context of Northern Ireland, around the border question.”Continue reading

Boris Johnson and Donald Trump - USA - UK News

Britain hasn’t even divorced the European Union yet, and already a new suitor has come calling: the United States. During a visit this week to the United Kingdom, Vice President Mike Pence brought word from his boss, President Donald Trump: The United States is eager to reach a new trade pact — one that won’t be possible until Britain completes Brexit and moves out of the 28-country EU trading bloc. “Our message is clear: The minute the UK is out, America is in,” Vice President Mike Pence said in a visit with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street on Thursday. Not so fast. Building a new U.S.-U.K. trading relationship atop the wreckage of Brexit won’t be easy. British officials are already vowing to resist an agreement that is lopsided in favor of the more powerful United States, creating potential for disputes over matters such as chlorinated chicken and the divisive Scottish dish haggis. “I know that you guys are pretty tough negotiators,” Johnson told Pence. “So, we’re going to work very hard to make sure that that free trade deal is one that works for all sides.” As a member of the EU, Britain outsourced its trade policy to the bloc’s bureaucrats in Brussels. Before it can pursue an independent course and reach a brand-new trade pact with Washington, London will have to negotiate a divorce with the EU— or crash out of the bloc without a deal and risk damaging its own economy. “Until that getsContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Europeans Voting - EU - European Union

Anna Amato was just two when she moved to Britain from Italy with her parents 55 years ago. She has lived in Britain ever since, attending school and university, working in a variety of jobs, and paying taxes. She has always lived in the city of Bristol in the west of England, marrying a British husband and raising two British children. Like thousands of European Union nationals who have made Britain their home after living in the country for decades, Amato always assumed she had earned the legal right to settle permanently. But the government didn’t agree. The interior ministry rejected her request for permanent residency last year, saying she did not have enough evidence to document her status. She was devastated. “You are in your country, it is a democracy, all of a sudden you are told after this time no one knows what is going to happen to you,” Amato, 57, told Reuters. “Where do I go? It is really, really scary.” Amato is one of a growing number of EU nationals denied the right to live indefinitely in Britain ahead of the country’s departure from the bloc, currently scheduled for October 31. For decades, Britain’s membership of the EU has guaranteed the bloc’s citizens the right to live and work in the country. But as Britain prepares to sever ties with Brussels after 46 years, EU citizens must apply for a new legal lifeline to remain, known as settled status. Under the government’s plans, EU citizens whoContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Jeremy Corbyn and Boris Johnson - UK POLITICS TODAY

Opposition parties said they would try to pass a law which would force Prime Minister Boris Johnson to seek a delay to Britain’s departure from the European Union and prevent a potentially chaotic no-deal exit at the end of October. The United Kingdom is heading towards a constitutional crisis at home and a showdown with the EU as Johnson has pledged to leave the bloc in 66 days without a deal unless Brussels agrees to renegotiate the Brexit divorce. Parliament returns from its summer break next week and is preparing for a battle with Johnson, who has vowed to take Britain out of the European Union at the end of October with or without an exit agreement. Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn hosted talks with opposition parties on Tuesday where they agreed that passing a law to force the government to seek a delay to Britain’s EU departure would probably have the most support. “We are going to come together and do the right thing by our country,” said Anna Soubry, leader of The Independent Group for Change party. “We are up against a prime minister who has no mandate for this and I think he has no regard for parliament.” The opposition parties are seeking to repeat what they did earlier this year when lawmakers seized control of the parliamentary agenda to pass a law forcing Johnson’s predecessor Theresa May to seek an extension to Britain’s EU membership. They also managed to change legislation to require parliament to beContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Boris Johnson - Headline Today in UK

The European Union on Tuesday rebuffed Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s demand that it reopen the Brexit divorce deal, saying Britain had failed to propose any realistic alternative to an agreed insurance policy for the Irish border. After more than three years of Brexit crisis, the United Kingdom is heading towards a showdown with the EU as Johnson has vowed to leave the bloc on Oct. 31 without a deal unless it agrees to renegotiate the divorce terms. In his opening bid to the EU ahead of meetings with French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Johnson wrote a four-page letter to European Council President Donald Tusk asking to axe the Irish border “backstop”. Johnson proposed that the backstop – part of the Withdrawal Agreement that then-prime minister Theresa May agreed last year – be replaced with a “commitment” to implement alternative arrangements as part of a deal on the post-Brexit relationship. Merkel, Europe’s most powerful leader, said the EU would consider “practical solutions” but that the Withdrawal Agreement, which contains the protocol on the Irish border “backstop”, did not need to be changed. “It is a question of the declaration on future ties,” she said during a visit to Iceland. “And I think we will act in a very unified way.” Brussels was more direct. “Those against the backstop and not proposing realistic alternatives in fact support re-establishing a border. Even if they do not admit it,” Tusk tweeted. A note seen by Reuters setting out the agreedContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Oliver Letwin UK NEWS

A Conservative lawmaker at the centre of efforts to block a no-deal Brexit said on Saturday he was pessimistic about his chances because he and other party colleagues could not support a caretaker government led by opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn. With Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowing to take Britain out of the European Union with or without a deal by Oct. 31, anti-Brexit politicians from all sides have been trying, and so far failing, to agree on a plan to stop it from happening. Corbyn, leader of the main opposition Labour Party, wants a caretaker government with himself as head, and then an election. But other opponents of a no-deal Brexit worry that Corbyn, a staunch leftist, would not win enough support, prompting leaders of smaller parties to put forward their own suggestions as to who could lead a government long enough to delay Brexit. Oliver Letwin, a lawmaker from Johnson’s ruling Conservatives, was asked to lend his support to Corbyn this week, but he told BBC Radio on Saturday: “I don’t think it’s at all likely that a majority would be formed for that and I wouldn’t be able to support that, no.” Asked to explain why, he said even an interim Corbyn-led government could do more damage than a disorderly exit from the world’s biggest trading bloc. Conservative opponents of a no-deal Brexit are deeply suspicious of Corbyn, whom they see as a dangerous Marxist intent on nationalising swathes of British industry and hiking state spending and taxes.Continue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Boris Johnson UK Political News Now

Britain is “ready and willing” to do a deal to leave the European Union if Brussels renegotiates the agreement, a senior government source said on Tuesday, denying that a no-deal Brexit was Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s central plan. Boris Johnson, who took over as prime minister two weeks ago, has taken a hard line with the EU, demanding that it show willingness to change the deal it agreed with his predecessor before negotiations can restart to secure Britain’s smooth departure from the bloc. His insistence that Britain is boosting preparations to leave without a divorce agreement if Brussels refuses to renegotiate has spooked markets, sent the pound tumbling and prompted some lawmakers to suspect a no-deal Brexit is his ultimate goal. A report in The Guardian newspaper cited EU diplomats as saying they believed a no-deal Brexit was the “UK government’s central scenario”. The government source said this was not the case, but the EU had to understand that Johnson could not again bring forward the deal that was rejected by Britain’s parliament three times, leading to the resignation of his predecessor Theresa May. “We want a deal. It’s sad that they don’t want to negotiate with us,” the source said, on condition of anonymity. “The fact that the Withdrawal Agreement has been rejected by large margins by the House of Commons on three occasions means that, if there’s going to be a deal, they have to be prepared to renegotiate. We’re ready and willing to do so.” Johnson hasContinue reading

Boris Johnson UK Political News Now

Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised on Tuesday to lead Britain out of the European Union on Oct. 31 “no matter what” as sterling tumbled and Ireland warned that the bloc would not be renegotiating the thrice defeated divorce deal. The British pound fell on Tuesday as investors bet Johnson’s Brexit brinkmanship could trigger a messy divorce that would sow chaos through the world economy and financial markets. Sterling crashed through trading barriers, falling to an intraday low of $1.2120 in shallower overnight Asian trade, the lowest since March 2017. The pound has lost 3.6 cents since Johnson was named Britain’s new prime minister a week ago. “The prime minister made clear that the UK will be leaving the EU on October 31, no matter what,” Boris Johnson’s Downing Street office said in a statement about a phone call with Irish PM Leo Varadkar. Johnson demanded again that one of the most hotly contested elements of the Brexit divorce agreement – the Irish border backstop – would have to be struck out if there was to be a deal. “The prime minister made clear that the government will approach any negotiations which take place with determination and energy and in a spirit of friendship, and that his clear preference is to leave the EU with a deal, but it must be one that abolishes the backstop,” Downing Street said. The backstop is a provision in the deal that would require Britain to obey some EU rules if no other way canContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up
Boris Johnson - USA NEWS HEADLINE

The British government is working on the assumption that the European Union will not renegotiate its Brexit deal and is ramping up preparations to leave the bloc on Oct. 31 without an agreement, senior ministers said on Sunday. Boris Johnson, who took over as British prime minister on Wednesday with a promise to deliver Brexit by the end of October “no ifs or buts”, plans to seek a new exit deal with the EU. The EU has said repeatedly that the deal cannot be reopened. PM Boris Johnson has set up a ‘war cabinet’ to push through Brexit ‘by any means necessary’ by October 31. In a move similar to Tony Blair’s ‘sofa government’, Mr Johnson will make all key decisions over Brexit with a team of just six senior ministers – all of whom are Brexiteers. Michael Gove, Chancellor Sajid Javid, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay, and the Attorney General Geoffrey Cox will be the core group of advisors to plot the UK’s exit from the EU. Leading Brexit supporter Michael Gove, who Johnson has put in charge of ‘no deal’ preparations, wrote in the Sunday Times newspaper that the government would undertake “intensive efforts” to secure a better deal from the EU. “We still hope they will change their minds, but we must operate on the assumption that they will not … No deal is now a very real prospect and we must make sure that we are ready,” Gove wrote. “Planning for no dealContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up