UK Election News, UK Voters

U.K. voters were deciding Thursday who they want to resolve the stalemate over Brexit in a parliamentary election seen as one of the most important since the end of World War II. Voting was underway across the country in a contest that pits Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who says he will take Britain out of the European Union by Jan. 31, against opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn, who promises another referendum on Brexit. With so much at stake, political parties have pushed the boundaries of truth, transparency and reality during five weeks of campaigning. Johnson’s Conservative Party was criticized for using misleading tactics on social media, while Corbyn’s Labour Party sought to win votes by promising to tax the rich, boost government spending and nationalize industries such as railroads and water companies. One of the focal points of the ugly campaign was the National Health Service, a deeply respected institution that has struggled to meet rising demand after nine years of austerity under Conservative-led governments. Jill Rutter, program director for the Institute for Government, said one of the things that stood out during the campaign was the shamelessness of the politicians. She cited Johnson’s claim that the Conservatives would build 40 hospitals. In fact that number includes many existing facilities that will be renovated. “Normally, if you point out to people that something doesn’t stand up, it’s actually sort of fiction, you slightly expect them to start … replacing that with a different new fact? Rutter said. “But here, actually, you’veContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Jeremy Corbyn

Second Brexit Referendum, Second Referendum, Brexit, Referendum, Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn: “I will adopt as prime minister, if I am, at the time, a neutral stance so that I can credibly carry out the results of that (referendum) to bring our communities and country together, rather than continuing an endless debate about the EU, and Brexit.”Continue reading

Brexit Headline Today

Jules Wilde has never voted for Britain’s Conservatives and would hate to do so at the Dec. 12 election, yet for the first time in his life, the 62-year-old carer is considering backing the governing party because of Brexit. Wrapped up against icy wind in the northwestern English town of Crewe, Wilde is one of thousands of supporters of the main opposition Labour Party who Prime Minister Boris Johnson hopes to win over to secure a parliamentary majority and push through his “great new deal” to leave the European Union. In regions of northern and central England which traditionally back Labour and are known as the “red wall”, Johnson’s team hopes to break the opposition party’s hold on voters, who have, sometimes for generations, rejected his party’s overtures. Crewe and Nantwich constituency, which voted in favour of leaving the EU in a 2016 referendum, has sometimes been described as a bellwether, and anecdotal evidence suggests some diehard Labour supporters are edging towards the Conservatives. Split between the industrial and railway town of Crewe and its more affluent neighbour Nantwich, only 48 more voters backed Labour than the Conservatives in 2017, making it a prime “swing seat” that Johnson’s team hopes to win back. In Wilde’s case, the prime minister’s promise to “get Brexit done” seems to be working. Born of personal experience caring for a friend who struggled to find the right healthcare, Wilde backs Brexit to control the levels of immigration from the EU he suspects is stretching Britain’sContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage, UK

Nigel Farage, the minor-party leader who played a major role in Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, is trying to throw his weight around again in the U.K.’s Brexit-dominated election. Farage on Friday piled the pressure on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, saying his Brexit Party will run against Johnson’s Conservatives across the country in the Dec. 12 early election unless Johnson abandons his divorce deal with the EU. Farage spoke a day after U.S. President Donald Trump barged into the British election campaign, urging his friend Farage to make an electoral pact with Johnson’s Conservatives. Trump told Farage on the Euroskeptic politician’s own radio phone-in show Thursday that he and Johnson would be “an unstoppable force.” Johnson on Friday gently rebuffed Trump’s suggestion and ruled out an electoral pact with Farage. “If I may respectfully say to all our friends around the world … the only way to get this thing done is to vote for us,” Johnson told ITV News. “If you vote for any other party, the risk is you’ll just get Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour Party, dither and delay.” All 650 seats in the House of Commons are up for grabs in the election that is coming more than two years early, with winners to be chosen by Britain’s 46 million voters. If the Brexit Party runs in only a small number of seats, that would help the Conservatives, who are vying with Farage for the support of Brexit-backing voters. Farage’s party, which was foundedContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Jeremy Corbyn vs Boris Johnson - UK News

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn traded barbs over Brexit and public spending Wednesday as campaigning unofficially kicked off for the country’s crucial yet unpredictable Dec. 12 general election. The Conservative and Labour leaders honed their pitches to the public while speaking during the House of Commons’ weekly Prime Minister’s Questions session, the last before Parliament is suspended for the five-week election campaign. “This election is a once-in-a-generation chance,” Corbyn said. “People have a chance to vote for real change after years of Conservative and Lib Dem cuts, privatization and tax handouts for the richest.” Johnson agreed “that there is a stark choice facing this country.” He said the choice was between “getting Brexit done and ending the dither and the delay” if the Conservatives won, and “economic catastrophe under the Labour Party.” The partisan peacocking came a day after the House of Commons approved an early election that politicians hope could break the deadlock over Britain’s stalled departure from the European Union. The date will become law once it is approved later Wednesday by the unelected House of Lords, which doesn’t have the power to overrule the elected Commons. The looming national vote comes 2 1/2 years before Britain’s next scheduled vote in 2022 and will be the country’s first December election since 1923. While Johnson’s Conservative Party has a wide lead in opinion polls, analysts say the election is unpredictable because Brexit cuts across traditional party loyalties. Johnson told Conservative lawmakers onContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Arlene Foster - Northern Ireland Headlines Politics Today

Boris Johnson’s allies in Northern Ireland vowed Saturday to keep rejecting the British prime minister’s divorce deal with the European Union until his government wins more concessions from the bloc. Arlene Foster, the leader of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, said she demanded honesty from the British government. She told her party conference in Belfast that regulatory and customs borders between Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom were not acceptable. “We will not give support to the government when we believe they are fundamentally wrong and acting in a way that is detrimental to Northern Ireland and taking us in the wrong direction,” Arlene Foster said. “We will oppose them and we will use our votes to defeat them.” Her comments are important because Johnson needs more votes in Parliament than just his Conservative party to get his Brexit deal passed. “Let me say clearly from this platform today that we want to support a deal that works for the whole of the United Kingdom and which does not leave Northern Ireland behind,” she said. “But without change, we will not vote for the prime minister’s agreement.” Parliament has already dealt Johnson a series of setbacks and derailed his promise to take Britain out of the EU by the end of the month “come what may.” Johnson has now pinned his hopes on an early general election, calling for one on Dec. 12, but how Britain will solve its Brexit stalemate is still completely up in theContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up
Brexit Headline Today

The United Kingdom will ultimately leave the European Union on the terms of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s deal, a senior Downing Street source said on Thursday, as EU leaders mulled offering London a three-month flexible Brexit delay. More than three years after voting 52%-48% to be the first sovereign country to leave the European project, the United Kingdom is waiting for the EU to decide how long the latest delay to Brexit should be. “This ends with us leaving with the PM’s deal,” a Downing Street source who spoke on condition of anonymity said. “We will leave with a deal, with the PM’s deal.” When asked when Brexit would happen, given that the current deadline of Oct. 31 is only a week away, the source said: “Parliament has taken back control.” Johnson won the top job by staking his career on getting Brexit done by Oct. 31, though he is almost certain to fail to do that after parliament defeated his proposed legislative timetable on Tuesday. So will there be an election before Christmas? “Perhaps,” the Downing Street source said. “We shall see.” As British politicians discuss the pros and cons of a Christmas election, responsibility for the timing of Brexit has passed to other European capitals: Berlin supports a three-month delay, while Paris is pushing for a shorter one. Timing is crucial to the Brexit riddle. While both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron appear to be fatigued by Brexit, they fear a no-deal exit thatContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
. Get all year access to premium articles on any device.
. Enjoy full, unlimited content with less on-site advertising.
. Exclusive long reads and a weekly look ahead email.
. Be the first to receive all the breaking news as they happen.
. Cancel anytime with Premium Membership. Limited time offers.
Log In Sign Up