Hong Kong Crisis Takes Center Stage Across Australian Universities

Tensions in Hong Kong have rippled across Australian universities, as supporters of the pro-democracy protests have been targeted and harassed by “patriotic” mainland students — with the tacit backing of Beijing. Public rallies and other acts of solidarity have been staged at several campuses during the Asian financial hub’s two months of civil unrest, including the emergence of “Lennon walls” plastered with sticky notes extolling the virtues of free speech and democracy. But that has angered some mainland Chinese students, who have physically confronted protestors, torn down message boards and demanded universities provide a “pure study environment” free of political messages that “insult” their homeland. Video from a small pro-democracy rally at Monash University on Tuesday shows a man aggressively shouting at students and manhandling someone who tried to step in, while a companion films the confrontation. “We wear masks because we know they will take photos and put it online on their social network sites and they try to find who (we) are,” said 23-year-old student James, who witnessed the skirmish. He said several students who participated had their details published online and at least one had been the target of harassment, including anonymous phone calls. Nationalist activists listed a pro-Hong Kong demonstrator’s home address in Melbourne on the popular messaging app WeChat, and discussed reporting mainland-born Chinese who supported the students to Beijing authorities for “welfare” when they get home. At the University of Queensland in Brisbane, a handful of hard-hatted students held its latest demonstration on FridayContinue reading

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Alek Sigley

“I intend now to return to normal life but wanted to first publicly thank everyone who worked to ensure I was safe and well,” Alek Sigley said in a statement released by his family’s spokeswoman in Australia, a day after he was flew from Pyongyang to Beijing and then Tokyo to be reunited with his Japanese wife.Continue reading

Scott Morrison - Australia News

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will visit the Solomon Islands next week, he said on Monday, as Western nations seek to rein in China’s influence on the tiny Pacific island and across the region. The visit comes as the United States and its allies are trying to ensure that Pacific countries that have diplomatic links with Taiwan, do not severe those in favour of establishing them with Beijing. The Solomon Islands is one of only a handful of Pacific countries to recognise Taiwan, a policy now in question after recent elections on the islands. China views Taiwan as a renegade province with no right to state-to-state ties. Morrison’s first overseas trip since winning re-election this month will also be the first time an Australian prime minister has visited the Solomon Islands since 2008. “The Pacific is front and centre of Australia’s strategic outlook,” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in an emailed statement. He did not mention efforts to preserve Taiwan’s diplomatic alliances, but analysts say the issue has become a flashpoint in the region and is likely to be raised. “China is the Solomon Islands’ largest trading partner and this is adding a lot of pressure on lawmakers to switch allegiances,” said Jonathan Pryke, Pacific Islands programme director at the think-tank, the Lowy Institute. On Friday, a senior U.S. official said Washington would help Pacific countries in the face of China’s efforts to expand its influence.Trending News 🔥 Scott Morrison Names New Cabinet With ‘Significant Agenda’ to Deliver AustralianContinue reading

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Scott Morrison and his family - Australia

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison named his new cabinet on Sunday, with most positions staying the same, saying the government had “a significant agenda” to deliver and it was time to get back to business. “I have high expectations of my ministry and clear goals for each of their roles,” Scott Morrison said in an emailed statement. Incoming Defence Minister Linda Reynolds, who served in the Army Reserves for almost three decades and rose to the rank of brigadier, replaces Christopher Pyne who has retired. Foreign Minister Marise Payne retains her position as does Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, Trade Minister Simon Birmingham, Energy Minister Angus Taylor and Attorney General Christian Porter. Morrison also created a national agency for Indigenous Australians which would report directly to new Indigenous Affairs Minister Ken Wyatt, the first Aboriginal cabinet minister. Mr Morrison said he intends to recommend Arthur Sinodinos, a senator from the eastern state of New South Wales, for the plum diplomatic post of ambassador to the United States, replacing Joe Hockey.Trending News 🔥 Scott Morrison to Rushing to Solomon Islands to Fend Off China From Pacific Island Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will visit the Solomon Islands next week, he said on Monday, as Western nations seek to rein in China’s influence on the tiny Pacific island and across the region.The visit comes as the United States and its allies are trying to ensure that Pacific countries that have diplomatic links with Taiwan, doContinue reading

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