Asylum Seekers

U.S. Asylum-Seekers

A Trump administration program forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico has evolved into a sweeping rejection of all forms of migrants, with both countries quietly working to keep people out of the U.S. despite threats to the migrants’ safety. The results serve the goals of both governments, which have targeted unauthorized migration at the behest of President Donald Trump, who threatened Mexico with potentially crippling tariffs earlier this year to force action. Some people sent to wait in the Mexican border cities of Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros said they never requested asylum, including Wilfredo Alvarez, a laborer from Honduras. He crossed the Rio Grande without permission to look for work to support his seven children and was unexpectedly put into the program. He was sent back to Mexico with a future court date. “We thought that if they caught us, they would deport us to our country, but it was not that way,” Alvarez said. “They threw us away here to Mexico, but we are not from here and it’s very difficult.” Others said they were never asked if they feared persecution in Mexico, despite U.S. government rules that say migrants should not be sent there if they face that risk. U.S. border agents give each returned migrant a date for an immigration court hearing at tents set up near the border. But the Mexican government has bused hundreds of migrants to cities around 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) away, ostensibly for their safety. And there’s no promise that MexicoContinue reading

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Asylum Seekers in Japan

At the end of June, a Nigerian man in his 40s died at an immigration detention center in Nagasaki. According to a support group, the man had been on a hunger strike to protest his lengthy confinement, which had continued for more than three years. The detention center has yet to reveal the cause of his death. Although some media outlets reported the man’s death, most didn’t go into detail. When the public hears of foreign nationals being detained, they most likely imagine people caught working without permits, since that is the context in which foreign nationals have been discussed lately. According to a Reuters report published in the Asahi Shimbun, of the approximately 1,500 foreign detainees who were being held as of June 2018, 604 were asylum-seekers whose situation is different from that of visa overstayers and so-called illegal workers. Although there was an increase in the number of asylum applicants Japan accepted in 2018, the actual number — 42 — was still miniscule, since there were 10,493 applications. However, the number of applications was down for the first time in eight years. In January 2018, the Justice Ministry introduced a stricter process to screen out people who are applying for refugee status in order to gain employment. The ministry stressed that the 42 whose applications were approved had been admitted to Japan for humanitarian reasons, since it was determined that their lives would have been in danger had they been forced to return to their home countries. TheContinue reading

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US Army Quickly Uncoiling Vicious Fencing Along Border With Mexico - US News

Virginia, an 18-year-old from Guatemala who is seeking asylum in the United States, had just one form of identification on her long journey north: her birth certificate. Now, the teenager waits in a shelter in a Mexican border town while her U.S. asylum case is decided – minus the birth certificate. Virginia said that when she turned herself in to immigration authorities in El Paso, U.S. officials took the certificate and refused to return it. “The more I asked the angrier they got,” she said. Discouraged by the asylum process, Virginia said she is considering abandoning her claim and going home but feels trapped without identification to show authorities along the way. She spoke on the condition that only her first name be published for fear of drawing attention to her situation. Ciudad Juarez officials and migrant attorneys say many asylum seekers are in a position similar to Virginia’s, left with no identification because U.S. officials confiscated their documents before sending them back to Mexico. Without ?IDs?, they say, it can be hard for migrants to find work in Mexico, receive money from their families or even return home. An official with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, who declined to be named, said it has been federal policy since 2015 to return possessions to migrants upon their release from custody – except for documents believed to be fraudulent or altered. The official did not address whether the policy was being followed consistently and declined to comment on specific casesContinue reading

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Finland to Put Electronic 'Fetters' On Asylum Seekers

The future government of Antti Rinne of Sdp intends to allow the use of footwear for asylum seekers who have received a negative decision. According to information from several sources from the HS, an agreement has been reached in the negotiating team which is no longer open to the party chairmen. The Aliens Act currently has criteria for detaining an alien. The idea behind Pantaseuranta is that instead of detention, a foreigner could be subject to technical control. In practice, this is a locational footman. At present, firing is used in Finland for persons sentenced to surveillance punishment. The legislative change envisaged by the future government applies to foreigners in general, but is intended for asylum seekers who have received a negative decision in practice. It does not apply to all those who have received a negative decision, but to those for whom the criteria laid down by law are met and the authorities consider the measure justified. More detailed criteria for the use of footwear will be defined in the course of drafting the law. So far, for example, there is an open question as to whether children and minors would also have access to footwear. It is also open to the question of whether the same or looser criteria could be imposed on the football stock than currently imposed by the Aliens Act on detention. The Aliens Act defines six possible conditions for detention. These include, for example, the risk of concealment or escapement, suspicion of crime orContinue reading

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Canada Asylum Seekers Headline News

Canada, Toronto lawyer Lorne Waldman said there were good reasons for accelerating the processing and deportation of people who crossed the border: it deters people with weak claims from making refugee claims in the hopes of living in Canada for years while their case wends through the system.Continue reading