African

Richard Gere with African Migrants

The Ocean Viking charity ship plucked 85 African migrants from the sea off Libya Friday, the latest rescue in the Mediterranean as Hollywood star Richard Gere boarded a second vessel to highlight the plight of those stranded. Gere boarded the Open Arms, which had over 100 migrants stuck on board, to keep a spotlight on their situation as they wait for European nations to agree to take them in. The Ocean Viking, operated by French NGOs SOS Mediterranee and Doctors without Borders (MSF), had to call off its initial search during the night and had to wait till dawn broke to finally find the migrant boat — to applause from the passengers. After setting off from Libya, they had been spotted on Thursday evening from a plane flying in the European Union’s migrant monitoring operation Sophia. They had come from Senegal, Mali, Ivory Coast and Sudan. Among them are five women and 15 children, the youngest aged just one. “It was the start of our third day at sea,” said a young woman as she clambered aboard Ocean Viking. Crew members continued to scan the waves for a second vessel that set sail at the same time. On Friday night, 39 migrants were rescued in international waters, Open Arms founder Oscar Camps tweeted, adding to the 121 already on the vessel. In Italy, Interior Minister Matteo Salvini fired off a warning to Oslo, where the rescue ship is registered. “Italy is not legally bound, nor disposed to taken in clandestine,Continue reading

African Migrants - Refugees traveling to US

Marilyne Tatang, 23, crossed nine borders in two months to reach Mexico from the West African nation of Cameroon, fleeing political violence after police torched her house, she said. She plans to soon take a bus north for four days and then cross a tenth border, into the United States. She is not alone – a record number of fellow Africans are flying to South America and then traversing thousands of miles of highway and a treacherous tropical rainforest to reach the United States. Tatang, who is eight months pregnant, took a raft across a river into Mexico on June 8, a day after Mexico struck a deal with U.S. President Donald Trump to do more to control the biggest flows of migrants heading north to the U.S. border in more than a decade. The migrants vying for entry at the U.S. southern border are mainly Central Americans. But growing numbers from a handful of African countries are joining them, prompting calls from Trump and Mexico for other countries in Latin America to do their part to slow the overall flood of migrants. As more Africans learn from relatives and friends who have made the trip that crossing Latin America to the United States is tough but not impossible, more are making the journey, and in turn are helping others follow in their footsteps, migration experts say. Trump’s threats to clamp down on migrants have ricocheted around the globe, paradoxically spurring some to exploit what they see as a narrowingContinue reading

Here's why you should get Politicoscope premium articles:
- Exposing the secrets and dark sides of people in power: corrupt politicians, abusive police officers, and more.
- Empowering the voiceless by offering a free platform for them to express themselves.
- Enjoy Politicoscope exclusive content all day, all year unlimited access on multiple devices.
* Best of all: Get unlimited premium content with less on-site advertising. Limited time offers. Cancel anytime.
Log In Sign Up