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Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, Bobi Wine vs Yoweri Museveni - Uganda Politics News

Ugandan pop star and opposition figure Bobi Wine said Monday he will challenge longtime President Yoweri Museveni in a 2021 election “on behalf of the people.” But Wine, whose real name is Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, said he is concerned about his safety after what he believes was an attempt on his life last August. His driver was shot dead in his car after protesters threw stones at the president’s motorcade. Wine’s arrest at the time sparked protests in Uganda’s capital, Kampala. The 37-year-old said he is fearful of harm from running for president because “there has never been a threat to this regime like the threat we pose to it today as a generation.” “I live every day as it comes, not being sure of the next day. I am not blind to the fact that the regime wants me dead and wants me dead as soon as possible.” Bobi Wine Authorities have repeatedly denied Wine is being targeted. As the leader of a popular movement known as “People Power,” Wine has captured the imagination of many who want to see the exit of Museveni, a U.S. ally on regional security who has held power since 1986 and looks set to seek a sixth term. Wine said his aim ahead of the election is “to multiply myself in various young men and women, so that there are as many Bobi Wines as possible.” Uganda has never witnessed a peaceful transfer of power since the East African country gained independence from BritainHere's the full story.

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Amhara Democratic Party, ADP vs Tigray People’s Liberation Front, TPLF - Ethiopia

A failed regional coup in Ethiopia has exposed rare divisions in the alliance that has dominated the country for three decades, with two of the four ethnic parties that form the ruling coalition trading insults in a public feud. While there have been disagreements among the parties in the past, analysts described the acrimonious exchange this week between the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and the Amhara Democratic Party (ADP) as among the most serious yet. The two groups have shared power with two other ethnic parties since 1991 in a coalition, the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), that tolerated little dissent until Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed took power last year and launched political reforms. The new tension between them arose after a rogue militia tried to seize power last month in the northern Amhara region, ruled by the ADP. The authorities blamed the June 22 attempted regional coup on Asamnew Tsige, a rogue ADP member, killed in fighting on the outskirts of the regional capital Bahir Dar. In recent days, the TPLF has accused the ADP of having stood by while Asamnew trained and armed a militia in the lead-up to the uprising, and of having failed to denounce him since. “The TPLF would have difficulty working with its so-called sister party, which hasn’t even dared to stare the killer in the eye,” Getachew Reda, executive member of TPLF and former national communication minister, told Reuters on Thursday. The ADP responded by accusing the TPLF of being “responsibleHere's the full story.

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John Joseph Magufuli - John Magufuli - Tanzania

Tanzania’s President John Magufuli urged Tanzania’s women to “set your ovaries free” and bear more children as a way to help boost the economy into a regional powerhouse, a step critics said would instead worsen inequality and poverty. “When you have a big population you build the economy. That’s why China’s economy is so huge,” John Magufuli said late on Tuesday, citing India and Nigeria as other examples of countries that gained from a demographic dividend. “I know that those who like to block ovaries will complain about my remarks. Set your ovaries free, let them block theirs,” John Magufuli told a gathering in his home town of Chato. Since taking office in 2015, Magufuli has launched an industrialisation campaign that has helped buoy economic growth, which has averaged 6-7% annually in recent years. But he has said a higher birth rate would achieve faster progress. Tanzania has sustained relatively high growth, averaging 6–7 percent a year, over the past decade. At the same time, the East African nation of 55 million people already has one of the world’s highest birth rates – around 5 children per woman. Data from the U.N. population fund UNFPA shows Tanzania’s population is growing by about 2.7 percent a year while most public hospitals and schools are overcrowded and many young people lack jobs. UNFPA says about a third of married women in Tanzania use contraceptives, but Magufuli has criticised Western-backed family planning programmes implemented by the health ministry. Last year Magufuli said curbingHere's the full story.

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Counter Terrorism

Nigeria has promised to assist Cameroon in combating the separatist crisis rocking the central African country’s English speaking region. The pledge, made during a security meeting, has been described by Cameroon authorities as reassuring, following accusations that separatist fighters in Cameroon were being trained in Nigeria, and that weapons they use are brought in through the neighboring country. Brigadier General Emmanuel Adamu Ndagi, leader of the Nigerian delegation to the Cameroon-Nigeria transborder security meeting that ended in Yaounde Saturday, says his country has been seriously affected by the separatist crisis in the English-speaking regions of Cameroon. The closure of parts of the border has led to a sharp decline in food imports, like sorghum, rice and onions, to Nigeria on one hand, while basic commodities exported from Nigeria, like fuel, are hard to get into Cameroon. Ndagi says because of the security, economic and humanitarian threats caused by the separatist war, Nigeria will support Cameroon in bringing peace to its troubled regions. “The current political upheavals in that region will not be allowed to affect our cordial relations,” said Ndagi. “We will continue to support your efforts to bring lasting peace to the region. This will facilitate the return of Cameroonian refugees that have crossed the border into Nigerian territory. We must reduce vulnerabilities along our borders that are being exploited to perpetrate transnational organized crime notably terrorism, proliferation of small arms and light weapons as well as piracy.” When Cameroon declared war on the armed separatists in November 2017,Here's the full story.

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Bosco Ntaganda - Congolese - Congo

Judges at the International Criminal Court on Monday convicted Bosco Ntaganda, a former Congolese military leader, on charges of atrocities including murder, rape and conscripting child soldiers. Ntaganda, 45, was convicted for acts committed while he was military operations chief at the Union of Congolese Patriots (UPC) militia in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2002-2003. Ntaganda’s conviction is a rare success for prosecutors at the ICC, an international court set up in 2002 to prosecute war crimes and crimes against humanity when its member states are unable or unwilling to do so. Ntaganda’s sentence will be determined at a later hearing. “Mr Ntaganda please rise”, said judge Robert Fremr, reading a summary of the ruling. “The chamber…having heard all the evidence mentioned by the parties, finds you as concerns count one, murder as a crime against humanity, guilty.” The court then continued to find Ntaganda guilty on all 18 charges against him. His lawyers argued that Ntaganda had sought to maintain discipline among his troops, punishing those that violated rules of war. Ntaganda, in a dark blue suit, showed no emotion as the sentence was read out. He has 30 days to appeal. In the conflict in Congo, Ntaganda’s UPC, dominated by the Hema clan, targeted rival Lendu people for expulsion from the mineral-rich Ituri region. Hundreds of civilians were killed and many thousands were forced to flee. Ntaganda’s boss, UPC leader Thomas Lubanga, is currently serving a 14-year prison sentence after his conviction at theHere's the full story.

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Cyril Ramaphosa - South Africa Politics Headlines News

Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane has made another adverse finding against Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan, this time in relation to the establishment of the so-called “rogue unit” at the South African Revenue Service (SARS) in 2007. At the time, Gordhan was the commissioner of SARS. He was appointed as minister of finance in 2009. Mkhwebane released her report on the “rogue unit” on Friday during a press briefing at her offices in Pretoria. She told journalists she had divided her Gordhan probe into parts to deal with the various allegations: That Gordhan lied to Parliament by not disclosing his meeting with a member of the Gupta family;That SARS established an unlawful intelligence unit (the so-called “rogue unit”);That this unit allegedly obtained illegal equipment to conduct intelligence operations Findings On the first count, Mkhwebane said Gordhan had failed to remember anything that happened during the supposed meeting, and she thought this was implausible. On the SARS rogue unit issue, she found that former SARS commissioner Oupa Magashula had lied under oath during his interview with her by saying no such intelligence unit existed. The unit was established without involving the State Security Agency (SSA). Under former finance minister Trevor Manuel, SARS had already begun operating the unit and Gordhan should have been aware of this, she said. The commissioner of SARS is the accounting officer and was therefore accountable. On the alleged possession of intelligence equipment, evidence in her possession confirmed its existence. “If SARS’ operations were lawful, it is unclearHere's the full story.

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African Migrants - Refugees traveling to US

Marilyne Tatang, 23, crossed nine borders in two months to reach Mexico from the West African nation of Cameroon, fleeing political violence after police torched her house, she said. She plans to soon take a bus north for four days and then cross a tenth border, into the United States. She is not alone – a record number of fellow Africans are flying to South America and then traversing thousands of miles of highway and a treacherous tropical rainforest to reach the United States. Tatang, who is eight months pregnant, took a raft across a river into Mexico on June 8, a day after Mexico struck a deal with U.S. President Donald Trump to do more to control the biggest flows of migrants heading north to the U.S. border in more than a decade. The migrants vying for entry at the U.S. southern border are mainly Central Americans. But growing numbers from a handful of African countries are joining them, prompting calls from Trump and Mexico for other countries in Latin America to do their part to slow the overall flood of migrants. As more Africans learn from relatives and friends who have made the trip that crossing Latin America to the United States is tough but not impossible, more are making the journey, and in turn are helping others follow in their footsteps, migration experts say. Trump’s threats to clamp down on migrants have ricocheted around the globe, paradoxically spurring some to exploit what they see as a narrowingHere's the full story.

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Emmerson Mnangagwa - Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe has run out of passports and vehicle registration number plates, forcing citizens to wait for long periods to get them – yet another sign of a desperate shortage of U.S. dollars in the southern African nation. A hoped-for economic turnaround under President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who took over from Robert Mugabe after a 2017 coup, is yet to materialise. Instead, Zimbabweans are enduring shortages of U.S. dollars, fuel, bread and 15-hour power cuts. Last week, the government renamed its interim currency, the RTGS dollar, the Zimbabwe dollar and made it the country’s sole legal tender. That ended a decade of dollarisation and took another step towards relaunching a fully-fledged currency. At the passport office in Harare early on Wednesday, hundreds of people huddled in the morning winter cold after arriving as early as 5 a.m. (0300 GMT) to queue to apply for passports. They were told to check their documents in 2022. That is because a special paper and ink used to make passports has to be imported but there is no foreign currency. Bothwell Mhashu, one of those queueing, said he wanted to escape the economic troubles at home and join his elder brother in Namibia. He applied for a passport in June 2018 and was supposed to get his document after three months. “They just told me that my passport is not ready, I have to check again in August. This is not fair,” a despondent Mhashu said as he left the passport office. In 2008, Zimbabweans sleptHere's the full story.

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Sudanese, Sudan Protest

The mass marches held in Sudan this week breathed new life into the uprising that toppled long-ruling autocrat Omar al-Bashir, but the protesters and the ruling military council remain at an impasse amid fears the country could slide into further chaos. Tens of thousands of people marched through the streets of the capital, Khartoum, and other areas on Sunday, vowing to complete the revolution they launched in December. Nearly a dozen people were killed in clashes as security forces prevented the demonstrators from reaching the military headquarters and the Nile-side presidential palace. It was the biggest show of determination by the protesters since security forces violently dispersed their main sit-in outside the military headquarters on June 3, killing at least 128 people. That triggered the suspension of talks on forming a transitional government just as the two sides seemed on the verge of an agreement. Ethiopian and African Union mediators are working to restart the talks, but both sides have hardened their demands since last month’s violence, with the generals saying earlier proposals are off the table and the protesters calling for an immediate transition to civilian rule and an investigation into the killings. Here’s a look at where things may be heading. FROM TRIUMPH TO TRAGEDY Protests first erupted in December in response to price hikes but rapidly escalated into near-daily marches calling for an end to al-Bashir’s nearly 30-year rule. Troops largely refused al-Bashir’s orders to fire on the protesters, and the military removed him from power onHere's the full story.

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David Makhura, Gauteng - South Africa

Like President Cyril Ramaphosa’s state of the nation address, the premier’s ‘roadmap for 2030’ isn’t short on big dreams. Gauteng Premier David Makhura’s state of the province address (Sopa) on Monday morning revealed a vision for a Gauteng which proves that President Cyril Ramaphosa is not the only leader with big dreams. David Makhura described a “vision for Gauteng,” which he said formed part of a plan titled “Growing Gauteng Together: Our Roadmap to 2030”, which will be finalised by August. The premier envisions a Gauteng almost entirely devoid of social ills. He spelt out a list of his wishes for the province. This would be a Gauteng where “no one goes to bed hungry”, “the economy reflects the full diversity of our population and harnesses the full potential of all the people”, “everyone has a job and earns a living wage”, and “businesses, big and small, thrive and prosper”. In addition, in Makhura’s proposed Gauteng of the future, “every household has access to basic shelter, a piece of land and a decent income”, as well as “quality healthcare”. David Makhura: “Everyone, young and old, has access to the kind of education that unleashes their full potential” and “all residents have access to basic services and quality infrastructure”. In addition, Makhura wants to provide a province where “everyone feels safe and can walk the streets at any time”, “women enjoy their rights, free from all forms of patriarchy”, and “the environment is protected and cared for”. The wish list continuesHere's the full story.

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Migrants die of disease in Libya detention; UN criticized

In the desert of western Libya, hundreds of African migrants were held for months in a hangar filled with maggot-covered garbage and sewage. They shared a couple of buckets of water between them and barely survived on one meal a day. More than 20 died from disease and hunger, they said. The migrants and their advocates accused U.N. aid agencies of turning a blind eye or responding too slowly to their plight. The U.N refugee agency, or UNHCR, denies it’s been unresponsive, saying it has been unable to access parts of the facility, run by one of Libya’s many militias. The commander in charge of the facility denied there was any lack of access. Internal memos and emails leaked to The Associated Press also show disagreement among the UNHCR and other aid agencies over conditions at the site in the town of Zintan, with one NGO working on behalf of UNHCR denying there was lack of food, even as it acknowledged it hadn’t been able to see the majority of migrants held there. The suffering of the migrants held in Zintan underscores the impact of the European Union’s effective yet much-criticized policy of blocking Africans from sailing across the Mediterranean to its shores and keeping them in Libya. Funded and trained by the EU, Libyan border guards have been stepping up efforts to stop migrants from crossing. As a result, thousands of migrants are trapped in a country thrown into chaos by war. At least 6,000 are locked up inHere's the full story.

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Beji Caid Essebsi - Tunisia Politics

Tunisia’s president is recovering his health and speaking to colleagues, authorities said on Friday, signalling a return to normality after a turbulent 24 hours in which the elderly leader fell ill and militants staged attacks in the capital. President Beji Caid Essebsi, 92, a major player in the North African country’s transition to democracy following a 2011 revolution, was taken to a military hospital on Thursday after suffering a “severe health crisis”. His health emergency coincided with attacks by two suicide bombers who blew themselves up in Tunis, killing one officer and wounding several others. The attacks, claimed by Islamic State, took place months before an election and at the peak of a tourist season in which Tunisia is hoping for a record number of visitors. Alarmed by the spate of troubling news, many Tunisians described Thursday it as a “black day”. But on Friday, normal life appeared to be returning. Shops reopened in Charles De Gaulle, a commercial street, and cafes were crowded in the main Habib Bourguiba street. Tourists and Tunisians alike wandered the markets as normal. “We are not afraid, we will not give up,” said a woman who gave her name as Sana. “We will continue our lives and our democracy, which frightens them.” Tourism Minister Rene Trabelsi told reporters that the incident would not affect tourism in the country, adding that tourist sites were under tight security surveillance. “DESPERATE ACT” The presidency spokeswoman said Essebsi’s health had improved significantly and he had called the defenceHere's the full story.

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Mohamed Morsi, Mohamed MorsiMohammed Morsi Of Muslim Brotherhood - Egypt News Headlines

The children of high-profile Egyptian Islamists detained in the same prison as former President Mohammed Mursi before his sudden death last week say they fear for their parents’ health. Mohammed Morsi, 67, died after collapsing during a court appearance at Cairo’s Tora prison complex, where he was moved after army chief-turned-President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi overthrew him in 2013 and cracked down on the Brotherhood and its supporters. Other senior Brotherhood members are jailed in Tora’s maximum-security “Scorpion” wing, often in solitary confinement. The families of four detainees, all at Tora, said their relatives were being held under extremely poor conditions, deprived of adequate healthcare. Reuters was unable to independently confirm the families’ assertions about prison conditions and the state of health of their relatives. An interior ministry spokesman and Egypt’s State Information Service, which handles relations with the foreign media, did not respond to several calls and messages seeking comment about the families’ accounts, including accusations that some of their relatives needed surgery for abuse suffered in detention. Egyptian officials have previously denied mistreating prisoners or neglecting their health. here Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, a 68-year-old Islamist former presidential candidate who ran for election against Mursi in 2012, is held at Tora’s Al Mazra wing. Arrested in February 2018, he is held in pre-trial detention over alleged connections with the now-banned Brotherhood. He denies the charges, according to his son Ahmed. Aboul Fotouh has diabetes, hypertension, heart and respiration problems which require him to sleep with an oxygen machine thatHere's the full story.

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Army Chief of Staff Seare Mekonnen Buried - Ethiopia

Ethiopia held a memorial on Tuesday for the army chief of staff slain with four other senior officials in weekend attacks that posed the biggest threat yet to the prime minister’s reforms. Abiy Ahmed, who survived a grenade attack at a rally in his honour last year, sat in the front row at the memorial and wiped tears from his eyes with a white handkerchief. Abiy took power 15 months ago and has won widespread international praise for kickstarting political and economic reforms, but his shake-up of the military and intelligence services has earned him powerful enemies at home. His government is also struggling to contain discontent from Ethiopia’s myriad ethnic groups fighting the federal government and each other for greater influence and resources. The foiled plot to seize control of the northern Amhara region and the assassinations in the national capital Adis Abeba underscored the threat of spiralling violence in Africa’s second-most populous nation. In addition to the killing of the chief of staff in the capital, Amhara state president Ambachew Mekonnen and an adviser were killed in the region’s main city Bahir Dar. The attacks were led by Amhara’s head of state security General Asamnew Tsige, who had been openly recruiting fighters for ethnic militias in a state that has become a flashpoint for violence. Asamnew, the alleged coup plotter, was shot on Monday near Bahir Dar, according to the prime minister’s office. RISKS Hundreds of soldiers and officers in uniform gathered for the ceremony in a hugeHere's the full story.

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Ambachew Mekonnen - Ethiopia News

Ethiopia’s army chief of staff and the regional president of the northern state of Amhara were killed in two related attacks when a general tried to seize control of Amhara in an attempted coup, the prime minister’s office said on Sunday. Amhara state president Ambachew Mekonnen and his advisor were shot dead and the state’s attorney general was wounded in Amhara’s capital of Bahir Dar on Saturday evening, according to a statement from the office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. In a separate attack the same night, Ethiopia’s army Chief of Staff Seare Mekonnen and another retired general were shot dead in Seare’s home in Addis Ababa by his bodyguard. The two attacks were linked, the statement said, without giving details. Abiy’s office named Amhara state security head General Asamnew Tsige as responsible for the foiled coup, without giving details of his whereabouts. Asamnew was released from prison last year, having been given an amnesty for a similar coup attempt, according to media reports. Abiy took office just over a year ago and embarked on unprecedented reforms in Ethiopia, Africa’s second-most populous country and one of its fastest-growing economies. But the premier’s shake-up of the military and intelligence services has earned him powerful enemies, while his government is struggling to rein in powerful figures in Ethiopia’s myriad ethnic groups fighting the federal government and each other for greater influence and resources. The shooting in Bahir Dar occurred when the state president – an ally of Abiy – was holding aHere's the full story.

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Merera Gudina, Ethiopia

Opposition politicians in Ethiopia are warning against a delay to national elections due in 2020 that would be the first under reformist Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed but are under threat from an explosion of regional ethnic rivalries. Earlier this month, the election board said insecurity, which has driven 2.4 million people out of their homes according to the United Nations, could delay next year’s parliament vote. A national census has already been postponed twice, potentially undermining logistics for the polls including the drawing up of constituencies. Critics say postponing the national vote could cause an adverse social reaction, further fuel regional conflicts, and damage Abiy’s democratic credentials. “If the government is going to postpone the general election … it will anger the public,” former political prisoner Merera Gudina told Reuters by phone. He chairs the opposition Oromo Federalist Congress party from a region, Oromia, at the heart of anti-government protests in recent years. “Once the public begins to express its anger … no one will have the means or the power to control it.” Ethiopia’s 100 million citizens are seeing unprecedented political change. Abiy, who took power last year after his predecessor suddenly resigned, has freed journalists and activists, lifted bans on political parties, and prosecuted officials accused of gross human rights abuses. “CONFLICTS ESCALATING” Those reforms followed three years of sporadic deadly protests against the government in which hundreds died and thousands were imprisoned. Local elections last year were postponed due to unrest. Election board chairwoman Birtukan Mideksa acknowledgedHere's the full story.

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Muhammadu Buhari - Nigeria Politics Headline

“It will take the next two months before ministers can come on board. Bringing them in now may disrupt the clean-up going on. So, Nigerians just have to be patient.” This was Garba Shehu, presidential spokesman, speaking to Reuters on July 1, 2015 on the hold-up in appointing ministers. He said the president was taking his time to assemble a team of “credible and competent” Nigerians. But after six months of suspense and wearisome wait, some persons of blemished character and of inchoate competence still got hoisted into the cabinet. What a pathos-inducing denouement that was? As a matter of fact, reinforcing failure is solving a problem with the same washed-out tools, methods and live ware. A president is as good as his cabinet; this is the reason competence must supersede every other value item in the check-list. It has been 14 days since the inauguration of the second Buhari administration, and it is shaping up to be the sophomore of a prosaic interlude charged with a numbing suspense. Really, I think this uneasy wait could be the result of intense lobbying in “high places” or a consequence of ambivalence in making that important decision of appointing persons to the cabinet by President Buhari. And there is the speculation that most of the “arid hands” may return because they are angling and sparing no quarter in scheming to have another round at retailed power. In an essay entitled, ‘Mr President, may we discuss your cabinet?’ Simon Kolawole delivered an incisiveHere's the full story.

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